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p-V-T diagram for ideal gases

p-V-T diagram for ideal gases

The relationship between the pressure, volume and temperature of ideal gases is described by the gas laws.

Physics

Keywords

p-V-T diagram, ideal gas, gas laws, Boyle-Mariotte law, Gay-Lussac´s 1st law, Gay-Lussac´s 2nd law, P-v-T surface, isochoric process, isothermal process, isobaric process, value of a quantity, state quantity, thermodynamics, temperature, pressure, volume, gas, temperature change, volumetric thermal expansion, physical property, physics, physical

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When we view the p-V-T diagram from the T axis, we see a two-dimensional p-V diagram which describes corresponding changes in the volume and pressure of the gas at a fixed temperature.

When the gas is compressed at a constant temperature, its pressure increases. To ensure this, the gas has to release heat while being compressed and absorb heat while expanding.

This change is described by the Boyle-Mariotte law: if the temperature remains constant, the pressure and volume of a given amount of gas are inversely proportional.

The process takes place along isotherms.

When we view the p-V-T diagram from the V axis, we see a two-dimensional p-T diagram which describes corresponding changes in the pressure and temperature of the gas at a fixed pressure.

When the gas is heated while its volume is unchanged, its pressure will increase. This change is described by Gay-Lussac´s 2nd law: if the volume remains constant, the pressure of a given amount of gas is in direct proportion to its temperature. The process takes place along isochors.

When we view the p-V-T diagram from the p axis, we see a two-dimensional V-T diagram which describes corresponding changes in the temperature and volume of the gas at a fixed pressure.

When the gas is heated while the pressure remains unchanged, its volume will increase. This change is described by Gay-Lussac´s 1st law: if the pressure remains constant, the volume and temperature of a given amount of gas are directly proportional. The process takes place along isobars.

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