Your cart is empty

Shop

Quantity: 0

Total: 0,00

0

From the Stone Age to the Iron Age

From the Stone Age to the Iron Age

This animation demonstrates the development of the axe throughout archaeological periods.

History

Keywords

axe, hand axe, Palaeolithic, Neolithic period, Chalcolithic, Bronze Age, Iron Age, copper, Ötzi, prehistory, Stone Age, device, tool, arrowhead, axe head, hoe, bracelet, scraper, spearhead, arrow quiver, arrow, pickaxe, pot, jewellery, sword, toolmaking, weapons, lifestyle, history

Related items

Scenes

Evolution of the axe

  • Palaeolithic - Old Stone Age, an archaeological time period starting about 2.4 million years ago and ending around 10000 BC.
  • Mesolithic - An archaeological time period between about 10000 BC and 7000 BC.
  • Neolithic - Polished Stone Age, between about 7000 BC and 4500 BC.
  • Chalcolithic - Also known as the Copper Age or Eneolithic. It refers to the time period between about 4500 BC and 3300 BC.
  • Bronze Age - An archaeological time period between about 3300 BC and 1200 BC.
  • Iron Age - An archaeological time period starting around 1200 BC.
  • hand axe - A teardrop-shaped tool formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock. It was an universally used tool.
  • hand axe - A teardrop-shaped tool formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock. It was an universally used tool.
  • scraper - A chipped stone tool used for cleaning animal hides.
  • arrowhead - Chipped stone arrowheads were fastened to the shafts with animal sinew or plant fibre.
  • needle - Made of bone, they were used to make clothes and punch holes in leather.
  • axe head - It was formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock, then polishing the edges.
  • rope - Rope made of plant fibre or animal sinew. It was used to fasten the axe head to the haft.
  • haft - They were made of wood. The axe head was either fastened to the side of the haft or to the top, by splitting it and inserting the head between the two parts.
  • axe head
  • stone axe
  • arrowhead - Chipped stone arrowheads were fastened to the shafts with animal sinew or plant fibre.
  • knife - Chipped stone knives with thin and sharp edges. They were used to chop meat, cut leather and wood.
  • rope
  • eye
  • haft
  • polished stone axe head with an eye
  • polished stone axe head
  • polished stone axes - Polished stone axes were made in several forms. One of the basic types was made with a wooden handle split at the top, the head fastened between the parts with a rope made of plant fibres. For the other type a hole (an eye) was drilled in the head, then the haft inserted in it. The head was secured with a wedge.
  • hoe head - A polished stone head.
  • hoe - It is as old as agriculture itself. The polished, flat head was attached to the wooden haft with plant fibres.
  • antler hoe head - Antlers and horns of animals killed by hunters were used to make tools. Antler hoes were typical tools in this period.
  • axe head - The back of the copper axe head was folded back for a better grip on the haft.
  • copper flat axe - Its head was made of copper and attached to the wooden haft with plant fibres.
  • head
  • rope
  • haft
  • copper flat axe
  • spearhead - Spearheads and arrowheads were usually made of copper in this period. The shaft was inserted in the hollow end of the head, then fastened with plant fibres or leather straps looped through a ring at the rim of the head.
  • bracelets - Jewellery was also made of copper.
  • axe head
  • cloak - It was woven from dried grass.
  • arrow quiver - It was made of leather and served to store arrows.
  • arrows - The shafts were made of the shoots of viburnum sapwood, arrowheads from flint stone. The arrowheads were glued to the shafts with a birch tar.
  • bow - It was hewn from the trunk of a yew tree. It was about 180 cm long and its range was about 30–50 m.
  • Ötzi - The Iceman, or the Man from Hauslabjoch lived about 5,300 years ago, in the early Copper Age. His mummy was found on 19 September 1991 in the Ötztal Alps, near Hauslabjoch, on the border between Austria and Italy, at an altitude of 3,210m. He is the world’s oldest fully preserved mummy. When he died, he was probably about 45 years old and 158 cm tall and weighed about 50 kg.
  • cap - It was made of bearskin, with a leather strap attached to it.
  • axe - The 9.5 cm long head was made of copper, and fixed to a 60 cm long wooden haft.
  • leggings - These were worn on the legs, tied with leather straps.
  • shoes - They were made using bearskin for the soles and deer hide for the top. Hay was wrapped around the foot in the shoe which served as insulation and padding.
  • pickaxe - It could be used for several purposes (e.g. mining, cutting down trees). The haft was wedged into a hole drilled in the axe head.
  • pickaxe head - Bronze pickaxe head with two blades opposite each other.
  • socketed axe - An advanced type of axe, which appeared in the late Bronze Age. The blade was usually wider than the poll. The axe head was hollow; it was used as a socket for the curved wooden haft.
  • socketed axe head - There was a small ring at the rim of the hollow axe head; the rope was looped through it to fasten the head to the haft. Axes could also be hung in bundles with the help of this ring.
  • pickaxe - The bronze pickaxe could be used for several purposes (e.g. mining, cutting down trees). The haft was wedged into a hole drilled in the axe head.
  • pickaxe head - Bronze pickaxe head with two blades opposite each other.
  • socketed axe - An advanced type of axe, which appeared in the late Bronze Age. The blade was usually wider than the poll. The axe head was hollow; it was used as a socket for the curved wooden haft.
  • socketed axe head - There was a small ring at the rim of the hollow axe head; the rope was looped through it to fasten the head to the haft. Axes could also be hung in bundles with the help of this ring.
  • vessel - Bronze vessel with handles, the proof of advanced craftsmanship.
  • jewellery - Typical, spiral-shaped, they were worn as jewellery or used to decorate clothes.
  • iron axe - These tools appeared in the late Iron Age and became widespread in Ancient Rome. They are still in use today.
  • head
  • haft
  • eye
  • helmet
  • iron axe
  • axe head
  • sword

Palaeolithic

  • Palaeolithic - Old Stone Age, an archaeological time period starting about 2.4 million years ago and ending around 10000 BC.
  • Mesolithic - An archaeological time period between about 10000 BC and 7000 BC.
  • Neolithic - Polished Stone Age, between about 7000 BC and 4500 BC.
  • Chalcolithic - Also known as the Copper Age or Eneolithic. It refers to the time period between about 4500 BC and 3300 BC.
  • Bronze Age - An archaeological time period between about 3300 BC and 1200 BC.
  • Iron Age - An archaeological time period starting around 1200 BC.
  • hand axe - A teardrop-shaped tool formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock. It was an universally used tool.
  • hand axe - A teardrop-shaped tool formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock. It was an universally used tool.
  • scraper - A chipped stone tool used for cleaning animal hides.
  • arrowhead - Chipped stone arrowheads were fastened to the shafts with animal sinew or plant fibre.
  • needle - Made of bone, they were used to make clothes and punch holes in leather.
  • axe head - It was formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock, then polishing the edges.
  • rope - Rope made of plant fibre or animal sinew. It was used to fasten the axe head to the haft.
  • haft - They were made of wood. The axe head was either fastened to the side of the haft or to the top, by splitting it and inserting the head between the two parts.
  • axe head
  • stone axe
  • arrowhead - Chipped stone arrowheads were fastened to the shafts with animal sinew or plant fibre.
  • knife - Chipped stone knives with thin and sharp edges. They were used to chop meat, cut leather and wood.
  • rope
  • eye
  • haft
  • polished stone axe head with an eye
  • polished stone axe head
  • polished stone axes - Polished stone axes were made in several forms. One of the basic types was made with a wooden handle split at the top, the head fastened between the parts with a rope made of plant fibres. For the other type a hole (an eye) was drilled in the head, then the haft inserted in it. The head was secured with a wedge.
  • hoe head - A polished stone head.
  • hoe - It is as old as agriculture itself. The polished, flat head was attached to the wooden haft with plant fibres.
  • antler hoe head - Antlers and horns of animals killed by hunters were used to make tools. Antler hoes were typical tools in this period.
  • axe head - The back of the copper axe head was folded back for a better grip on the haft.
  • copper flat axe - Its head was made of copper and attached to the wooden haft with plant fibres.
  • head
  • rope
  • haft
  • copper flat axe
  • spearhead - Spearheads and arrowheads were usually made of copper in this period. The shaft was inserted in the hollow end of the head, then fastened with plant fibres or leather straps looped through a ring at the rim of the head.
  • bracelets - Jewellery was also made of copper.
  • axe head
  • cloak - It was woven from dried grass.
  • arrow quiver - It was made of leather and served to store arrows.
  • arrows - The shafts were made of the shoots of viburnum sapwood, arrowheads from flint stone. The arrowheads were glued to the shafts with a birch tar.
  • bow - It was hewn from the trunk of a yew tree. It was about 180 cm long and its range was about 30–50 m.
  • Ötzi - The Iceman, or the Man from Hauslabjoch lived about 5,300 years ago, in the early Copper Age. His mummy was found on 19 September 1991 in the Ötztal Alps, near Hauslabjoch, on the border between Austria and Italy, at an altitude of 3,210m. He is the world’s oldest fully preserved mummy. When he died, he was probably about 45 years old and 158 cm tall and weighed about 50 kg.
  • cap - It was made of bearskin, with a leather strap attached to it.
  • axe - The 9.5 cm long head was made of copper, and fixed to a 60 cm long wooden haft.
  • leggings - These were worn on the legs, tied with leather straps.
  • shoes - They were made using bearskin for the soles and deer hide for the top. Hay was wrapped around the foot in the shoe which served as insulation and padding.
  • pickaxe - It could be used for several purposes (e.g. mining, cutting down trees). The haft was wedged into a hole drilled in the axe head.
  • pickaxe head - Bronze pickaxe head with two blades opposite each other.
  • socketed axe - An advanced type of axe, which appeared in the late Bronze Age. The blade was usually wider than the poll. The axe head was hollow; it was used as a socket for the curved wooden haft.
  • socketed axe head - There was a small ring at the rim of the hollow axe head; the rope was looped through it to fasten the head to the haft. Axes could also be hung in bundles with the help of this ring.
  • pickaxe - The bronze pickaxe could be used for several purposes (e.g. mining, cutting down trees). The haft was wedged into a hole drilled in the axe head.
  • pickaxe head - Bronze pickaxe head with two blades opposite each other.
  • socketed axe - An advanced type of axe, which appeared in the late Bronze Age. The blade was usually wider than the poll. The axe head was hollow; it was used as a socket for the curved wooden haft.
  • socketed axe head - There was a small ring at the rim of the hollow axe head; the rope was looped through it to fasten the head to the haft. Axes could also be hung in bundles with the help of this ring.
  • vessel - Bronze vessel with handles, the proof of advanced craftsmanship.
  • jewellery - Typical, spiral-shaped, they were worn as jewellery or used to decorate clothes.
  • iron axe - These tools appeared in the late Iron Age and became widespread in Ancient Rome. They are still in use today.
  • head
  • haft
  • eye
  • helmet
  • iron axe
  • axe head
  • sword

Mesolithic

  • Palaeolithic - Old Stone Age, an archaeological time period starting about 2.4 million years ago and ending around 10000 BC.
  • Mesolithic - An archaeological time period between about 10000 BC and 7000 BC.
  • Neolithic - Polished Stone Age, between about 7000 BC and 4500 BC.
  • Chalcolithic - Also known as the Copper Age or Eneolithic. It refers to the time period between about 4500 BC and 3300 BC.
  • Bronze Age - An archaeological time period between about 3300 BC and 1200 BC.
  • Iron Age - An archaeological time period starting around 1200 BC.
  • hand axe - A teardrop-shaped tool formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock. It was an universally used tool.
  • hand axe - A teardrop-shaped tool formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock. It was an universally used tool.
  • scraper - A chipped stone tool used for cleaning animal hides.
  • arrowhead - Chipped stone arrowheads were fastened to the shafts with animal sinew or plant fibre.
  • needle - Made of bone, they were used to make clothes and punch holes in leather.
  • axe head - It was formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock, then polishing the edges.
  • rope - Rope made of plant fibre or animal sinew. It was used to fasten the axe head to the haft.
  • haft - They were made of wood. The axe head was either fastened to the side of the haft or to the top, by splitting it and inserting the head between the two parts.
  • axe head
  • stone axe
  • arrowhead - Chipped stone arrowheads were fastened to the shafts with animal sinew or plant fibre.
  • knife - Chipped stone knives with thin and sharp edges. They were used to chop meat, cut leather and wood.
  • rope
  • eye
  • haft
  • polished stone axe head with an eye
  • polished stone axe head
  • polished stone axes - Polished stone axes were made in several forms. One of the basic types was made with a wooden handle split at the top, the head fastened between the parts with a rope made of plant fibres. For the other type a hole (an eye) was drilled in the head, then the haft inserted in it. The head was secured with a wedge.
  • hoe head - A polished stone head.
  • hoe - It is as old as agriculture itself. The polished, flat head was attached to the wooden haft with plant fibres.
  • antler hoe head - Antlers and horns of animals killed by hunters were used to make tools. Antler hoes were typical tools in this period.
  • axe head - The back of the copper axe head was folded back for a better grip on the haft.
  • copper flat axe - Its head was made of copper and attached to the wooden haft with plant fibres.
  • head
  • rope
  • haft
  • copper flat axe
  • spearhead - Spearheads and arrowheads were usually made of copper in this period. The shaft was inserted in the hollow end of the head, then fastened with plant fibres or leather straps looped through a ring at the rim of the head.
  • bracelets - Jewellery was also made of copper.
  • axe head
  • cloak - It was woven from dried grass.
  • arrow quiver - It was made of leather and served to store arrows.
  • arrows - The shafts were made of the shoots of viburnum sapwood, arrowheads from flint stone. The arrowheads were glued to the shafts with a birch tar.
  • bow - It was hewn from the trunk of a yew tree. It was about 180 cm long and its range was about 30–50 m.
  • Ötzi - The Iceman, or the Man from Hauslabjoch lived about 5,300 years ago, in the early Copper Age. His mummy was found on 19 September 1991 in the Ötztal Alps, near Hauslabjoch, on the border between Austria and Italy, at an altitude of 3,210m. He is the world’s oldest fully preserved mummy. When he died, he was probably about 45 years old and 158 cm tall and weighed about 50 kg.
  • cap - It was made of bearskin, with a leather strap attached to it.
  • axe - The 9.5 cm long head was made of copper, and fixed to a 60 cm long wooden haft.
  • leggings - These were worn on the legs, tied with leather straps.
  • shoes - They were made using bearskin for the soles and deer hide for the top. Hay was wrapped around the foot in the shoe which served as insulation and padding.
  • pickaxe - It could be used for several purposes (e.g. mining, cutting down trees). The haft was wedged into a hole drilled in the axe head.
  • pickaxe head - Bronze pickaxe head with two blades opposite each other.
  • socketed axe - An advanced type of axe, which appeared in the late Bronze Age. The blade was usually wider than the poll. The axe head was hollow; it was used as a socket for the curved wooden haft.
  • socketed axe head - There was a small ring at the rim of the hollow axe head; the rope was looped through it to fasten the head to the haft. Axes could also be hung in bundles with the help of this ring.
  • pickaxe - The bronze pickaxe could be used for several purposes (e.g. mining, cutting down trees). The haft was wedged into a hole drilled in the axe head.
  • pickaxe head - Bronze pickaxe head with two blades opposite each other.
  • socketed axe - An advanced type of axe, which appeared in the late Bronze Age. The blade was usually wider than the poll. The axe head was hollow; it was used as a socket for the curved wooden haft.
  • socketed axe head - There was a small ring at the rim of the hollow axe head; the rope was looped through it to fasten the head to the haft. Axes could also be hung in bundles with the help of this ring.
  • vessel - Bronze vessel with handles, the proof of advanced craftsmanship.
  • jewellery - Typical, spiral-shaped, they were worn as jewellery or used to decorate clothes.
  • iron axe - These tools appeared in the late Iron Age and became widespread in Ancient Rome. They are still in use today.
  • head
  • haft
  • eye
  • helmet
  • iron axe
  • axe head
  • sword

Neolithic

  • Palaeolithic - Old Stone Age, an archaeological time period starting about 2.4 million years ago and ending around 10000 BC.
  • Mesolithic - An archaeological time period between about 10000 BC and 7000 BC.
  • Neolithic - Polished Stone Age, between about 7000 BC and 4500 BC.
  • Chalcolithic - Also known as the Copper Age or Eneolithic. It refers to the time period between about 4500 BC and 3300 BC.
  • Bronze Age - An archaeological time period between about 3300 BC and 1200 BC.
  • Iron Age - An archaeological time period starting around 1200 BC.
  • hand axe - A teardrop-shaped tool formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock. It was an universally used tool.
  • hand axe - A teardrop-shaped tool formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock. It was an universally used tool.
  • scraper - A chipped stone tool used for cleaning animal hides.
  • arrowhead - Chipped stone arrowheads were fastened to the shafts with animal sinew or plant fibre.
  • needle - Made of bone, they were used to make clothes and punch holes in leather.
  • axe head - It was formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock, then polishing the edges.
  • rope - Rope made of plant fibre or animal sinew. It was used to fasten the axe head to the haft.
  • haft - They were made of wood. The axe head was either fastened to the side of the haft or to the top, by splitting it and inserting the head between the two parts.
  • axe head
  • stone axe
  • arrowhead - Chipped stone arrowheads were fastened to the shafts with animal sinew or plant fibre.
  • knife - Chipped stone knives with thin and sharp edges. They were used to chop meat, cut leather and wood.
  • rope
  • eye
  • haft
  • polished stone axe head with an eye
  • polished stone axe head
  • polished stone axes - Polished stone axes were made in several forms. One of the basic types was made with a wooden handle split at the top, the head fastened between the parts with a rope made of plant fibres. For the other type a hole (an eye) was drilled in the head, then the haft inserted in it. The head was secured with a wedge.
  • hoe head - A polished stone head.
  • hoe - It is as old as agriculture itself. The polished, flat head was attached to the wooden haft with plant fibres.
  • antler hoe head - Antlers and horns of animals killed by hunters were used to make tools. Antler hoes were typical tools in this period.
  • axe head - The back of the copper axe head was folded back for a better grip on the haft.
  • copper flat axe - Its head was made of copper and attached to the wooden haft with plant fibres.
  • head
  • rope
  • haft
  • copper flat axe
  • spearhead - Spearheads and arrowheads were usually made of copper in this period. The shaft was inserted in the hollow end of the head, then fastened with plant fibres or leather straps looped through a ring at the rim of the head.
  • bracelets - Jewellery was also made of copper.
  • axe head
  • cloak - It was woven from dried grass.
  • arrow quiver - It was made of leather and served to store arrows.
  • arrows - The shafts were made of the shoots of viburnum sapwood, arrowheads from flint stone. The arrowheads were glued to the shafts with a birch tar.
  • bow - It was hewn from the trunk of a yew tree. It was about 180 cm long and its range was about 30–50 m.
  • Ötzi - The Iceman, or the Man from Hauslabjoch lived about 5,300 years ago, in the early Copper Age. His mummy was found on 19 September 1991 in the Ötztal Alps, near Hauslabjoch, on the border between Austria and Italy, at an altitude of 3,210m. He is the world’s oldest fully preserved mummy. When he died, he was probably about 45 years old and 158 cm tall and weighed about 50 kg.
  • cap - It was made of bearskin, with a leather strap attached to it.
  • axe - The 9.5 cm long head was made of copper, and fixed to a 60 cm long wooden haft.
  • leggings - These were worn on the legs, tied with leather straps.
  • shoes - They were made using bearskin for the soles and deer hide for the top. Hay was wrapped around the foot in the shoe which served as insulation and padding.
  • pickaxe - It could be used for several purposes (e.g. mining, cutting down trees). The haft was wedged into a hole drilled in the axe head.
  • pickaxe head - Bronze pickaxe head with two blades opposite each other.
  • socketed axe - An advanced type of axe, which appeared in the late Bronze Age. The blade was usually wider than the poll. The axe head was hollow; it was used as a socket for the curved wooden haft.
  • socketed axe head - There was a small ring at the rim of the hollow axe head; the rope was looped through it to fasten the head to the haft. Axes could also be hung in bundles with the help of this ring.
  • pickaxe - The bronze pickaxe could be used for several purposes (e.g. mining, cutting down trees). The haft was wedged into a hole drilled in the axe head.
  • pickaxe head - Bronze pickaxe head with two blades opposite each other.
  • socketed axe - An advanced type of axe, which appeared in the late Bronze Age. The blade was usually wider than the poll. The axe head was hollow; it was used as a socket for the curved wooden haft.
  • socketed axe head - There was a small ring at the rim of the hollow axe head; the rope was looped through it to fasten the head to the haft. Axes could also be hung in bundles with the help of this ring.
  • vessel - Bronze vessel with handles, the proof of advanced craftsmanship.
  • jewellery - Typical, spiral-shaped, they were worn as jewellery or used to decorate clothes.
  • iron axe - These tools appeared in the late Iron Age and became widespread in Ancient Rome. They are still in use today.
  • head
  • haft
  • eye
  • helmet
  • iron axe
  • axe head
  • sword

Chalcolithic

  • Palaeolithic - Old Stone Age, an archaeological time period starting about 2.4 million years ago and ending around 10000 BC.
  • Mesolithic - An archaeological time period between about 10000 BC and 7000 BC.
  • Neolithic - Polished Stone Age, between about 7000 BC and 4500 BC.
  • Chalcolithic - Also known as the Copper Age or Eneolithic. It refers to the time period between about 4500 BC and 3300 BC.
  • Bronze Age - An archaeological time period between about 3300 BC and 1200 BC.
  • Iron Age - An archaeological time period starting around 1200 BC.
  • hand axe - A teardrop-shaped tool formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock. It was an universally used tool.
  • hand axe - A teardrop-shaped tool formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock. It was an universally used tool.
  • scraper - A chipped stone tool used for cleaning animal hides.
  • arrowhead - Chipped stone arrowheads were fastened to the shafts with animal sinew or plant fibre.
  • needle - Made of bone, they were used to make clothes and punch holes in leather.
  • axe head - It was formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock, then polishing the edges.
  • rope - Rope made of plant fibre or animal sinew. It was used to fasten the axe head to the haft.
  • haft - They were made of wood. The axe head was either fastened to the side of the haft or to the top, by splitting it and inserting the head between the two parts.
  • axe head
  • stone axe
  • arrowhead - Chipped stone arrowheads were fastened to the shafts with animal sinew or plant fibre.
  • knife - Chipped stone knives with thin and sharp edges. They were used to chop meat, cut leather and wood.
  • rope
  • eye
  • haft
  • polished stone axe head with an eye
  • polished stone axe head
  • polished stone axes - Polished stone axes were made in several forms. One of the basic types was made with a wooden handle split at the top, the head fastened between the parts with a rope made of plant fibres. For the other type a hole (an eye) was drilled in the head, then the haft inserted in it. The head was secured with a wedge.
  • hoe head - A polished stone head.
  • hoe - It is as old as agriculture itself. The polished, flat head was attached to the wooden haft with plant fibres.
  • antler hoe head - Antlers and horns of animals killed by hunters were used to make tools. Antler hoes were typical tools in this period.
  • axe head - The back of the copper axe head was folded back for a better grip on the haft.
  • copper flat axe - Its head was made of copper and attached to the wooden haft with plant fibres.
  • head
  • rope
  • haft
  • copper flat axe
  • spearhead - Spearheads and arrowheads were usually made of copper in this period. The shaft was inserted in the hollow end of the head, then fastened with plant fibres or leather straps looped through a ring at the rim of the head.
  • bracelets - Jewellery was also made of copper.
  • axe head
  • cloak - It was woven from dried grass.
  • arrow quiver - It was made of leather and served to store arrows.
  • arrows - The shafts were made of the shoots of viburnum sapwood, arrowheads from flint stone. The arrowheads were glued to the shafts with a birch tar.
  • bow - It was hewn from the trunk of a yew tree. It was about 180 cm long and its range was about 30–50 m.
  • Ötzi - The Iceman, or the Man from Hauslabjoch lived about 5,300 years ago, in the early Copper Age. His mummy was found on 19 September 1991 in the Ötztal Alps, near Hauslabjoch, on the border between Austria and Italy, at an altitude of 3,210m. He is the world’s oldest fully preserved mummy. When he died, he was probably about 45 years old and 158 cm tall and weighed about 50 kg.
  • cap - It was made of bearskin, with a leather strap attached to it.
  • axe - The 9.5 cm long head was made of copper, and fixed to a 60 cm long wooden haft.
  • leggings - These were worn on the legs, tied with leather straps.
  • shoes - They were made using bearskin for the soles and deer hide for the top. Hay was wrapped around the foot in the shoe which served as insulation and padding.
  • pickaxe - It could be used for several purposes (e.g. mining, cutting down trees). The haft was wedged into a hole drilled in the axe head.
  • pickaxe head - Bronze pickaxe head with two blades opposite each other.
  • socketed axe - An advanced type of axe, which appeared in the late Bronze Age. The blade was usually wider than the poll. The axe head was hollow; it was used as a socket for the curved wooden haft.
  • socketed axe head - There was a small ring at the rim of the hollow axe head; the rope was looped through it to fasten the head to the haft. Axes could also be hung in bundles with the help of this ring.
  • pickaxe - The bronze pickaxe could be used for several purposes (e.g. mining, cutting down trees). The haft was wedged into a hole drilled in the axe head.
  • pickaxe head - Bronze pickaxe head with two blades opposite each other.
  • socketed axe - An advanced type of axe, which appeared in the late Bronze Age. The blade was usually wider than the poll. The axe head was hollow; it was used as a socket for the curved wooden haft.
  • socketed axe head - There was a small ring at the rim of the hollow axe head; the rope was looped through it to fasten the head to the haft. Axes could also be hung in bundles with the help of this ring.
  • vessel - Bronze vessel with handles, the proof of advanced craftsmanship.
  • jewellery - Typical, spiral-shaped, they were worn as jewellery or used to decorate clothes.
  • iron axe - These tools appeared in the late Iron Age and became widespread in Ancient Rome. They are still in use today.
  • head
  • haft
  • eye
  • helmet
  • iron axe
  • axe head
  • sword

Bronz Age

  • Palaeolithic - Old Stone Age, an archaeological time period starting about 2.4 million years ago and ending around 10000 BC.
  • Mesolithic - An archaeological time period between about 10000 BC and 7000 BC.
  • Neolithic - Polished Stone Age, between about 7000 BC and 4500 BC.
  • Chalcolithic - Also known as the Copper Age or Eneolithic. It refers to the time period between about 4500 BC and 3300 BC.
  • Bronze Age - An archaeological time period between about 3300 BC and 1200 BC.
  • Iron Age - An archaeological time period starting around 1200 BC.
  • hand axe - A teardrop-shaped tool formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock. It was an universally used tool.
  • hand axe - A teardrop-shaped tool formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock. It was an universally used tool.
  • scraper - A chipped stone tool used for cleaning animal hides.
  • arrowhead - Chipped stone arrowheads were fastened to the shafts with animal sinew or plant fibre.
  • needle - Made of bone, they were used to make clothes and punch holes in leather.
  • axe head - It was formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock, then polishing the edges.
  • rope - Rope made of plant fibre or animal sinew. It was used to fasten the axe head to the haft.
  • haft - They were made of wood. The axe head was either fastened to the side of the haft or to the top, by splitting it and inserting the head between the two parts.
  • axe head
  • stone axe
  • arrowhead - Chipped stone arrowheads were fastened to the shafts with animal sinew or plant fibre.
  • knife - Chipped stone knives with thin and sharp edges. They were used to chop meat, cut leather and wood.
  • rope
  • eye
  • haft
  • polished stone axe head with an eye
  • polished stone axe head
  • polished stone axes - Polished stone axes were made in several forms. One of the basic types was made with a wooden handle split at the top, the head fastened between the parts with a rope made of plant fibres. For the other type a hole (an eye) was drilled in the head, then the haft inserted in it. The head was secured with a wedge.
  • hoe head - A polished stone head.
  • hoe - It is as old as agriculture itself. The polished, flat head was attached to the wooden haft with plant fibres.
  • antler hoe head - Antlers and horns of animals killed by hunters were used to make tools. Antler hoes were typical tools in this period.
  • axe head - The back of the copper axe head was folded back for a better grip on the haft.
  • copper flat axe - Its head was made of copper and attached to the wooden haft with plant fibres.
  • head
  • rope
  • haft
  • copper flat axe
  • spearhead - Spearheads and arrowheads were usually made of copper in this period. The shaft was inserted in the hollow end of the head, then fastened with plant fibres or leather straps looped through a ring at the rim of the head.
  • bracelets - Jewellery was also made of copper.
  • axe head
  • cloak - It was woven from dried grass.
  • arrow quiver - It was made of leather and served to store arrows.
  • arrows - The shafts were made of the shoots of viburnum sapwood, arrowheads from flint stone. The arrowheads were glued to the shafts with a birch tar.
  • bow - It was hewn from the trunk of a yew tree. It was about 180 cm long and its range was about 30–50 m.
  • Ötzi - The Iceman, or the Man from Hauslabjoch lived about 5,300 years ago, in the early Copper Age. His mummy was found on 19 September 1991 in the Ötztal Alps, near Hauslabjoch, on the border between Austria and Italy, at an altitude of 3,210m. He is the world’s oldest fully preserved mummy. When he died, he was probably about 45 years old and 158 cm tall and weighed about 50 kg.
  • cap - It was made of bearskin, with a leather strap attached to it.
  • axe - The 9.5 cm long head was made of copper, and fixed to a 60 cm long wooden haft.
  • leggings - These were worn on the legs, tied with leather straps.
  • shoes - They were made using bearskin for the soles and deer hide for the top. Hay was wrapped around the foot in the shoe which served as insulation and padding.
  • pickaxe - It could be used for several purposes (e.g. mining, cutting down trees). The haft was wedged into a hole drilled in the axe head.
  • pickaxe head - Bronze pickaxe head with two blades opposite each other.
  • socketed axe - An advanced type of axe, which appeared in the late Bronze Age. The blade was usually wider than the poll. The axe head was hollow; it was used as a socket for the curved wooden haft.
  • socketed axe head - There was a small ring at the rim of the hollow axe head; the rope was looped through it to fasten the head to the haft. Axes could also be hung in bundles with the help of this ring.
  • pickaxe - The bronze pickaxe could be used for several purposes (e.g. mining, cutting down trees). The haft was wedged into a hole drilled in the axe head.
  • pickaxe head - Bronze pickaxe head with two blades opposite each other.
  • socketed axe - An advanced type of axe, which appeared in the late Bronze Age. The blade was usually wider than the poll. The axe head was hollow; it was used as a socket for the curved wooden haft.
  • socketed axe head - There was a small ring at the rim of the hollow axe head; the rope was looped through it to fasten the head to the haft. Axes could also be hung in bundles with the help of this ring.
  • vessel - Bronze vessel with handles, the proof of advanced craftsmanship.
  • jewellery - Typical, spiral-shaped, they were worn as jewellery or used to decorate clothes.
  • iron axe - These tools appeared in the late Iron Age and became widespread in Ancient Rome. They are still in use today.
  • head
  • haft
  • eye
  • helmet
  • iron axe
  • axe head
  • sword

Iron Age

  • Palaeolithic - Old Stone Age, an archaeological time period starting about 2.4 million years ago and ending around 10000 BC.
  • Mesolithic - An archaeological time period between about 10000 BC and 7000 BC.
  • Neolithic - Polished Stone Age, between about 7000 BC and 4500 BC.
  • Chalcolithic - Also known as the Copper Age or Eneolithic. It refers to the time period between about 4500 BC and 3300 BC.
  • Bronze Age - An archaeological time period between about 3300 BC and 1200 BC.
  • Iron Age - An archaeological time period starting around 1200 BC.
  • hand axe - A teardrop-shaped tool formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock. It was an universally used tool.
  • hand axe - A teardrop-shaped tool formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock. It was an universally used tool.
  • scraper - A chipped stone tool used for cleaning animal hides.
  • arrowhead - Chipped stone arrowheads were fastened to the shafts with animal sinew or plant fibre.
  • needle - Made of bone, they were used to make clothes and punch holes in leather.
  • axe head - It was formed by chipping off pieces from a large pebble or piece of rock, then polishing the edges.
  • rope - Rope made of plant fibre or animal sinew. It was used to fasten the axe head to the haft.
  • haft - They were made of wood. The axe head was either fastened to the side of the haft or to the top, by splitting it and inserting the head between the two parts.
  • axe head
  • stone axe
  • arrowhead - Chipped stone arrowheads were fastened to the shafts with animal sinew or plant fibre.
  • knife - Chipped stone knives with thin and sharp edges. They were used to chop meat, cut leather and wood.
  • rope
  • eye
  • haft
  • polished stone axe head with an eye
  • polished stone axe head
  • polished stone axes - Polished stone axes were made in several forms. One of the basic types was made with a wooden handle split at the top, the head fastened between the parts with a rope made of plant fibres. For the other type a hole (an eye) was drilled in the head, then the haft inserted in it. The head was secured with a wedge.
  • hoe head - A polished stone head.
  • hoe - It is as old as agriculture itself. The polished, flat head was attached to the wooden haft with plant fibres.
  • antler hoe head - Antlers and horns of animals killed by hunters were used to make tools. Antler hoes were typical tools in this period.
  • axe head - The back of the copper axe head was folded back for a better grip on the haft.
  • copper flat axe - Its head was made of copper and attached to the wooden haft with plant fibres.
  • head
  • rope
  • haft
  • copper flat axe
  • spearhead - Spearheads and arrowheads were usually made of copper in this period. The shaft was inserted in the hollow end of the head, then fastened with plant fibres or leather straps looped through a ring at the rim of the head.
  • bracelets - Jewellery was also made of copper.
  • axe head
  • cloak - It was woven from dried grass.
  • arrow quiver - It was made of leather and served to store arrows.
  • arrows - The shafts were made of the shoots of viburnum sapwood, arrowheads from flint stone. The arrowheads were glued to the shafts with a birch tar.
  • bow - It was hewn from the trunk of a yew tree. It was about 180 cm long and its range was about 30–50 m.
  • Ötzi - The Iceman, or the Man from Hauslabjoch lived about 5,300 years ago, in the early Copper Age. His mummy was found on 19 September 1991 in the Ötztal Alps, near Hauslabjoch, on the border between Austria and Italy, at an altitude of 3,210m. He is the world’s oldest fully preserved mummy. When he died, he was probably about 45 years old and 158 cm tall and weighed about 50 kg.
  • cap - It was made of bearskin, with a leather strap attached to it.
  • axe - The 9.5 cm long head was made of copper, and fixed to a 60 cm long wooden haft.
  • leggings - These were worn on the legs, tied with leather straps.
  • shoes - They were made using bearskin for the soles and deer hide for the top. Hay was wrapped around the foot in the shoe which served as insulation and padding.
  • pickaxe - It could be used for several purposes (e.g. mining, cutting down trees). The haft was wedged into a hole drilled in the axe head.
  • pickaxe head - Bronze pickaxe head with two blades opposite each other.
  • socketed axe - An advanced type of axe, which appeared in the late Bronze Age. The blade was usually wider than the poll. The axe head was hollow; it was used as a socket for the curved wooden haft.
  • socketed axe head - There was a small ring at the rim of the hollow axe head; the rope was looped through it to fasten the head to the haft. Axes could also be hung in bundles with the help of this ring.
  • pickaxe - The bronze pickaxe could be used for several purposes (e.g. mining, cutting down trees). The haft was wedged into a hole drilled in the axe head.
  • pickaxe head - Bronze pickaxe head with two blades opposite each other.
  • socketed axe - An advanced type of axe, which appeared in the late Bronze Age. The blade was usually wider than the poll. The axe head was hollow; it was used as a socket for the curved wooden haft.
  • socketed axe head - There was a small ring at the rim of the hollow axe head; the rope was looped through it to fasten the head to the haft. Axes could also be hung in bundles with the help of this ring.
  • vessel - Bronze vessel with handles, the proof of advanced craftsmanship.
  • jewellery - Typical, spiral-shaped, they were worn as jewellery or used to decorate clothes.
  • iron axe - These tools appeared in the late Iron Age and became widespread in Ancient Rome. They are still in use today.
  • head
  • haft
  • eye
  • helmet
  • iron axe
  • axe head
  • sword

Animation

Narration

The history of mankind can be divided into archaeological periods, based on the material of the tools typically used by people of the periods and the technique used for making them. In contrast to historical periods, archaeological periods usually do not have clear boundaries and can even vary by region. The overview of the evolution of certain tools can also paint a true picture of the evolution of mankind.

The earliest archaeological period is called the Stone Age, which covers the Palaeolithic, the Mesolithic and the Neolithic.

In the Palaeolithic, tools were typically made of stone by chipping. The most important tool in this period was the versatile hand axe.

Stone polishing appeared in the Mesolithic, but it was as late as the Neolithic that the most sophisticated polished stone tools were made.

One of the most developed tools made by neolithic artisans was the polished stone axe with an eye drilled in the head.

The Stone Age was followed by periods characterised by the use of different metals. At first, the prevailing material for tools was stone and copper, later they used an alloy of the latter, bronze, and then iron.

Ötzi, the Iceman, who lived in the Copper Age or Chalcolithic, already used copper tools.

The earliest type of copper alloys was tin bronze, in which tin was added to copper. The most widely used tool in the late Bronze Age was the socketed axe.

The archaeological Iron Age followed the Bronze Age and generally ended around the beginning of the historical medieval period. However, its date and context vary depending on the culture and geographical region. In this period, tools made of iron dominated. The iron axe, typical of this period, is still among the most commonly used tools.

Related items

Neolithic settlements

As a result of the revolutionary advances in the Neolithic, settling human communities established the first lasting settlements.

Ötzi, the Iceman

The mummified body of a man who probably lived in the Chalcolithic period, was found in one of the glaciers of the Alps.

Palaeolithic cave

The first dwellings in human history provide a lot of information about the lifestyle of our ancestors.

Archaeological excavation (pit house)

Large construction sites provide archaeologists searching for artefacts with a great deal of work.

Human evolution

The brain and skull underwent significant changes during human evolution.

Hunebeds

These special dolmens located in present-day Netherlands were built about 5,000 years ago.

Megalithic cultures in Europe

Structures consisting of enormous stone blocks, dating back thousands of years, are monuments of megalithic cultures.

Noah’s ark

According to the Bible Noah was ordered by God to build a large vessel to save his family and the animals from the flood

Stonehenge (Great Britain, Bronze Age)

The world famous monument in England still poses mysteries for archaeologist.

The city of Ur (3rd millennium BC)

The ancient city located near the river Euphrates was an important Sumerian centre.

The spread of Homo sapiens on Earth

The 'wise man' originated in Africa and dispersed throughout most of the continents.

Woolly mammoth

Extinct proboscidea closely related to today's elephants, often hunted by prehistoric man.

Egyptian Pyramids (Giza, 26th century BC)

The Giza Necropolis is the only one of the Ancient wonders still intact.

Ferrous metallurgy (basic)

Raw iron is produced from iron ore in iron smelters.

Ferrous metallurgy (intermediate)

Raw iron is produced from iron ore in iron smelters.

Homo erectus

The ‘upright man’ used tools and could set fire.

Ziggurat (Ur, 3rd millennium BC)

Ziggurats were typical terraced step pyramids used as temples in ancient Mesopotamia.

Medieval smithy

The work of smiths – one of the first professions in history – became even more important in the Middle Ages.

Metals

Metal atoms form a regular lattice structure.

Added to your cart.