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Comparison of monocots and dicots

Comparison of monocots and dicots

The two groups of angiosperms are monocots and dicots.

Biology

Keywords

monocot, dicotyledon, tulip, loosestrife, parallel-veined leaves, net-veined leaf, fibrous root system, taproot system, angiosperm, flower, stem, stamen, petal, tepal, sepal, root, leaf, plant organs, gynoecium, vascular bundle, cambium, xylem, phloem, cotyledon, perianth, plant, biology

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Questions

  • Carrots are …
  • Wheat is a …
  • Monocot flowers do not have:
  • Dicot leaves do not have:
  • Monocot leaves do not have:
  • Poppies are …
  • Maize is a …
  • Oaks are …
  • Monocots generally have:
  • Monocots generally have:
  • Dicot flowers do not have:
  • Dicots usually have:
  • Dicots usually have:
  • Dicots generally have:
  • Is it true that monocots have secondary veins in their leaves?
  • Is it true that dicots have net-veined leaves?
  • Is it true that dicots have scattered vascular bundles in their stems?
  • Is it true that monocots have scattered vascular bundles in their stems?
  • Is it true that monocots have parallel-veined leaves?
  • Is it true that monocots do not have a primary vein in their leaves?
  • Is it true that dicots do not have a primary vein in their leaves?
  • Is it true that dicots do not have secondary veins in their leaves?
  • Is it true that dicots most commonly have six petals?
  • Is it true that dicots most commonly have five tepals?
  • Is it true that monocots commonly have six tepals?
  • Is it true that monocots often have six petals?
  • Pick the image that shows the stem of a plant that has parallel-veined leaves.

Scenes

Plants

  • parallel-veined leaf
  • net-veined leaf
  • fibrous root system
  • taproot system
  • monocotyledon
  • (Garden tulip)
  • dicotyledon
  • (Yellow pimpernel)

Flowers

  • gynoecium
  • stamen
  • tepal
  • petal
  • sepal

Cross section of stem

  • ground tissue
  • vascular bundle

Vascular bundles

  • xylem
  • phloem (inner bark)
  • cambium

Narration

Within the group of angiosperms, plants are grouped by the number of cotyledons in the seed. There are dicotyledons, or dicots, and monocotyledons, or monocots.

Dicots usually have taproot systems, which consist of a central root, called the taproot, with lateral roots branching out. Monocots typically have fibrous root systems.

But usually the easiest way to differentiate between monocot and dicot plants is to compare their leaves. Dicots have net-veined leaves with secondary veins branching out from a primary vein; the leaves are attached to the stem by petioles. Most monocots, however, have parallel-veined leaves that are attached to the stem by leaf sheaths, that is, their base surrounds the stem.

A dicot stem often branches, while a monocot stem does not typically branch out.

There are also differences in the structure of dicot and monocot flowers. In dicot flowers the perianth is differentiated, it consists of petals and a sepal, the flowers display pentamerous radial symmetry, meaning, the number of their components can be divided by five. Yellow pimpernel flowers, for example, consist of five sepals, five petals and five stamens. In monocot flowers, however, the perianth is homogenous, it consists of tepals. Monocot flowers display trimerous radial symmetry, that is, the number of their tepals can be divided by three. Tulip flowers consist of six tepals and six stamens.

Vascular bundles are arranged in a ring in the stems of herbaceous dicots, while they are scattered in monocots.

In the vascular bundle, the xylem conducts water and dissolved minerals from the roots to the other parts of the plants, while the phloem conducts organic substances.

The vascular bundles in herbaceous dicots contain a cambium layer between the phloem and the xylem, responsible for the growth of the stem. The vascular bundles in monocots do not typically contain cambium, so their stem cannot become thicker.

Dicots appeared at an earlier stage of evolution. About 200 thousand known herbaceous and woody plants belong to this group, while there are about 60 thousand monocot species.

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