Your cart is empty

Shop

Quantity: 0

Total: 0,00

0

Colosseum (Rome, 1st century)

Colosseum (Rome, 1st century)

The most famous and most magnificent amphitheatre of Rome was built in the 1st century.

History

Keywords

Colosseum, amphitheatre, Rome, Római Birodalom, animal fight, gladiator fight, arena, circus games, gladiator, building, edifice, Vespasian, Titus, Domitian, Nero, arch, entertainment, elliptic floor plan, auditorium, Flavian Amphitheatre, antiquity, persecution of Christians, emperor, imperial period, history

Related items

Questions

  • What does the term amphitheatre mean?
  • Where is the Colosseum?
  • In which ancient empire was the world's most famous amphitheatre built?
  • During the reign of which emperor did the construction of the Colosseum begin?
  • Whose statue used to stand in front of the Colosseum?
  • When was the Colosseum inaugurated?
  • What was the original name of the building?
  • After the statue of which emperor was the building renamed in the Middle Ages?
  • What is the length of the building?
  • Approximately how many spectators could the building host?
  • Who were the gladiators?
  • What does the salutation of gladiators entering the amphitheatre mean? ('Ave, Caesar, morituri te salutant')
  • What does the following phrase mean? 'Panem et circenses'
  • Is the following statement true? Sea battles were also simulated in the Colosseum.
  • What is the height of the building?
  • Who was history’s most famous (rebellious) gladiator?
  • What did the thumb turned downwards mean for the defeated gladiator?
  • Is the following statement true? Female gladiators were also fighting in the Colosseum.
  • Is it true that many Christians were killed in the Colosseum?
  • Is the following statement true? Gladiators could never be freed.
  • What did the Emperor's thumb turned upwards mean for the defeated gladiator?

Scenes

Amphitheatre

  • awning (velarium) - A structure made of canvas, held by masts and consoles, provided cover and shade for the spectators.
  • main entrance
  • arched entrance
  • rope
  • mast
  • console
  • canvas
  • plinth
  • relief
  • corridor - They made it easier to move within the building.
  • arch
  • window
  • pilaster

Arena

  • auditorium - The Colosseum could probably hold more than 50 thousand spectators.
  • emperor's balcony - The Emperor and his cortège watched the events from a separate balcony.
  • entrance to the arena
  • vomitorium - Through these the crowds could enter or exit the amphitheatre rapidly.
  • arena - The arena of the Colosseum was 86 m long and 54 m wide.
  • column
  • stairs
  • sector
  • exit for animals - Animals were brought from their cages to the arena through tunnels and elevators.
  • gladiators

Colosseum

  • elliptical shape - The Colosseum is 188 m long and 156 m wide.
  • main entrance
  • arched entrance
  • console
  • plinth
  • relief
  • corridor - They made it quick to move within the building.
  • arch
  • window
  • pilaster

Cutaway

  • pillar
  • stairs
  • arena - The arena of the Colosseum was 86 m long and 54 m wide.
  • auditorium - The Colosseum could probably hold more than 50 thousand spectators.
  • vomitorium - Through these the crowds could enter or exit the amphitheatre rapidly.
  • corridor - They made it quick to move within the building.
  • the emperor's balcony - The Emperor and his cortège watched the events from a separate balcony.
  • wooden floor - By shutting the water canals the arena of the Colosseum could be converted into an artificial lake.
  • sand - It covered the arena and served to soak up the blood that was shed there.
  • entrance to the arena
  • dungeons and cages - Gladiators' cells and cages for the animals were situated under the arena.
  • hypogeum
  • service rooms - Rooms of the gladiators, cages of the animals, storage rooms, machinery.
  • exit for animals - Animals were brought from their cages to the arena through tunnels and elevators.
  • service tunnel with niches - It surrounded the arena, on the opposite side of the wall surrounding it.

Animation

Time travel

Walk

Narration

Amphitheatres were typically elliptical-based structures that primarily served as venues for circus games.
The arena was surrounded by several storeys of seats that offered a safe place for the public to observe the fights.

A most infamous amphitheatre of the Ancient Roman Empire, the Colosseum, is one of the most famous structures in world history.
Its construction began under the reign of the Emperor Vespasian. The magnificent structure next to the Forum Romanum was inaugurated in 80 AD by Titus, Vespasian's successor. The finishing touches were added during Emperor Domitian's reign. Originally named the Flavian Amphitheatre after the Flavian dynasty that built it, the enormous building is said to have been renamed in the Middle Ages, when the structure was named after the nearby equestrian statue of the Emperor Nero.

The Colosseum was approximately 188 metres long, 156 metres wide and 50 metres high. The amphitheatre seated more than 50 thousand people with the emperor and his cortege occupying their own separate balcony above the main gates. The ingenious architects and engineers of the amphitheatre constructed a complex building out of limestone, tuff-stone and bricks. Regardless of the building's complexity, the system of entrances, stairs, descents and walkways worked exceptionally well in reality. (The shape and structure of the Colosseum inspired a number of architects of 20th-century football stadiums as well.)

The gladiators and the wild animals were led onto the 'stage' through ingeniously created walkways and integrated elevators from chambers located under the arena. By closing the drainage canals, they were able to create an artificial lake within the arena, in order to stage simulated sea battles. On the top, fourth storey, pedestals and consoles held large poles, to which a canopy was fixed to cover most of the amphitheatre.

In the course of many decades, a great many gladiators and wild animals lost their lives in the arena of the Colosseum, thus providing entertainment for the enthusiastic masses. (In the days when Christians were persecuted, many of them met the same fate as well.) The central amphitheatre of Rome, however, still attracts millions of tourists every year. Its condition is far from perfect now, but it remains one of the most important symbols of the imperial city. Visitors might even remember the following words from the medieval English historian, theologian and philosopher, the Venerable Bede: 'While stands the Coliseum, Rome shall stand; when falls the Coliseum, Rome shall fall; when Rome falls, the world shall fall'.

Related items

Pula Arena (Pula, 1st century)

The Pula Arena, located in present-day Croatia, was one of the largest Roman amphitheatres in the Antiquity.

Roman gladiators (2nd century)

Gladiators were combatants who entertained audiences in fights against each other or wild animals in ancient Roman arenas.

Circus Maximus (Rome)

The ancient Roman arena became well-known for the chariot races held here.

Ancient Roman aqueduct and road

The excellent road and aqueduct system covering the whole empire reflects well the development of the Roman civilisation.

Ancient Roman military camp

As the Roman Empire expanded, military camps were established on the newly conquered territories.

Ancient Roman senator with his wife

Senators, being members of the highest social class of ancient Rome, wore togas with purple edges.

Ancient Roman siege engines

Ancient Roman conquerors had effective siege engines developed for attacking fortifications.

Ara Pacis Augustae (Rome, 1st century BC)

The Altar of Peace, commissioned during the reign of Augustus, was one of the most important works of ancient Roman art.

Arch of Titus (Rome, 1st century)

The Arch of Triumph was built at the entrance of the Forum Romanum, to commemorate Emperor Titus’ victory in the Siege of Jerusalem.

Baths of Caracalla (Rome, 3rd century)

The magnificent bath complex of the Roman Emperor was built in the 3rd century AD.

Diocletian's Palace (Split, Croatia)

The fortress-like palace was built by Roman Emperor Diocletian on the coast near his home town.

Late Roman soldier (4th century)

The prosperity of the eastern part of the Roman Empire started in the early 4th century, during the reign of Emperor Constantine.

Leaning Tower of Pisa (14th century)

The medieval bell tower of the Cathedral of Pisa is the most famous leaning tower of the world.

Leonardo da Vinci’s workshop (Florence, 16th century)

Visit the workshop of the Renaissance polymath and his most influential inventions and works of art.

Pantheon (Rome, 2nd century)

The ´Temple of all gods´ was built during the reign of the Roman Emperor Hadrian.

Provinces and settlements of Ancient Rome

This animation presents the history of Ancient Rome throughout the centuries.

Teatro Olimpico (Vicenza, 16th century)

The first indoor theatre in modern history to be constructed according to the theatre-building codes of Antiquity was inaugurated in 1585.

Theatre of Pompey (Rome, 1st c. BC)

The building commissioned by Pompey the Great was the first permanent theatre in Ancient Rome.

Wonders of the Ancient World

Today only one of the Wonders of the Ancient World is still intact: the Pyramids of Giza.

Ancient Roman domus

Wealthy citizens in ancient Rome owned large houses with varied layouts of several rooms.

Roman soldier (1st century BC)

Mercenaries of the ancient Roman army were well-trained and well equipped with the most up-to-date weapons.

Added to your cart.